The Unquiet Dead Chapter 1 – AudioZine

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The Unquiet Dead: Anarchism, Fascism, and Mythology – Chapter 1. Fascist Ideology in Germany and Further – MP3ReadPrint Archive TorrentYouTube

This is the second installment of a book-length piece, The Unquiet Dead. The full text is available at unquietdead.tumblr.com; we will be posting recordings of other chapters in the future.

“Finally, we must preserve our ability to remember and mourn our dead, and fight for a world in which both their choices and ours are real ones. Attacking these elements of human experience was an innovation of the fascists. “His death merely set a seal on the fact that he had never really existed… Totalitarian terror achieved its most terrible triumph when it succeeded… in making the decisions of conscience absolutely questionable and equivocal. When a man is faced with the alternative of betraying and thus murdering his friends or of sending his wife and children, for whom he is in every sense responsible, to their deaths; when even suicide would mean the immediate murder of his own family—how is he to decide? Who could solve the moral dilemma of the Greek mother who was allowed by the Nazis to choose which of her three children should be killed?” When our enemies give us such choices, our only possible response is communal defiance.”

 

“In Nazi Germany, questioning the validity of racism and antisemitism… was like questioning the existence of the world.” — Hannah Arendt

Musical Interlude The Valkyrie, III: “Magic Fire Music” – By Wagner

The Unquiet Dead .5 introduction – AudioZine

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The Unquiet Dead: Anarchism, Fascism and Mythology: introduction. – Anonymous –  MP3 Read Print Torrent –  ArchiveYouTube

This is the first installment of a book-length piece, The Unquiet Dead. The full text is available at unquietdead.tumblr.com; we will be posting recordings of other chapters in the future. The introduction includes an explanation of the project and reflections on history, myth, and essentialism.

“…We organized against white supremacy, which exists in non-fascist formations but is closely linked to fascism… and we knew that the U.S. police continue to be an armed, powerful, racist organization with links to explicitly fascist groups. Still, in many ways, we slept.
Alas, there is no haven to flee to; we cannot escape our doom, whether it comes from without or within, without facing it down. At present, this country is threatened by ISIS, a religious-fascist state force; rightwing populists use ISIS to justify their fascist rhetoric; the police continue to murder black people with little consequence; and elements of fascist mythology sometimes even manifest within radical communities.”

Musical Interludes – Over and Over by The Syndicate

Nativism and the Foundations of US Xenophobia

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30:59 – Nativism and the Foundations of US Xenophobia: An Old Doctrine of Hatred and Bigotry Reemerges – by CrimethInc. – MP3ReadArchiveTorrentYouTube

CrimethInc. released this essay to counter the jingoism of Independence Day in the US; it explores an alternate framework for understanding anti-immigrant sentiments in the US.

“Some have debated whether we should view the groundswell of support for Donald Trump through the lens of white supremacy or fascism, but we can also understand it through the framework of nativism, the doctrine of prioritizing the interests of the native-born over those of immigrants. Nativism has a long and ugly history in the United States, in which the ascendency of Donald Trump and his supporters is just the latest chapter. Here… we study nativism from its origins to the current day, tracing the common threads that connect all the ways the rich have preyed on the fears and prejudices of the exploited to turn them against those worse off than themselves.”

Musical Interludes: Indigo Girls – Shame on You

Undoing Sex – AudioZine

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Undoing Sex: against sexual optimism – by c.e. – MP3ReadPrintArchive TorrentYouTube

*This zine contains discussion of sexual assault*

“Undoing Sex” is a critique of sex-positivity that both draws upon and completely transcends second-wave feminist critiques. The essay explores the metaphysical quandaries faced by the “not-man” in their engagement with and survival of sex. Centering sex negativity in a transgender, queer experience of how the image of sexual pleasure and health is produced, marketed, and consumed by people of all genders, the text brings Marx, Foucault, Afropessimism, and other currently useful theories to bear upon the sexual impasse many (all?) of us face. It offers no prescriptive conclusions, but rather to speaks an array of inadequate coping strategies. We recommend it for all those who choose to have sex, for all those who choose to not have sex, and for those who feel that “choice” is not an adequate word.

Musical interludes – La Roux – In For The Kill

We must avoid falling into this trap, and so must always keep in mind that the celibate body is no purer, no more feminist, no less exploited. Just as a refusal to eat meat makes no change to the material basis of industrial agriculture, our refusals to fuck, much as our desires to fuck in different ways, don’t crack the material base of patriarchy. They may engender a better quality of life or more agency for individuals or communities, but these liberal models of “resistance” offer nothing in the way of a total break. This is the impasse faced by radical feminism: gestures proliferate but they only ever point towards the abolition of gender, glancing so close but never reaching the moment of Truth.

Lines In Sand – AudioZine

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1:07:16 – Lines In Sand: three essays on identity, oppression, and social war – by Peter Gelderloos – MP3ReadPrint ArchiveTorrentYouTube

“…I think we all need to fiercely reject the Ally as a primary identity of
struggle. You cannot give solidarity if you are not struggling first
and foremost for your own reasons. To be only or primarily an ally is to
be a parasite on others’ struggles, with no hope greater than to be a
benign parasite; it is to refuse to acknowledge our interests and place
in the world out of a dogmatic insistence on identifying ourselves with
the system we are supposed to be fighting. Being aware of relative
oppression and privilege is vital, but emphasizing those differences
over the fact that all of us have common enemies and all of us have
reasons to destroy the entire system is deliberately missing
opportunities to make ourselves stronger in this fight.”

Lines in Sand is a collection by Peter Gelderloos that looks
critically at identity politics and anti-oppression politics. All of
them are very thought provoking and well worth reading. These aren’t
knee-jerk criticisms, but rather are thoughtful explorations of the
problematic aspects of identity and anti-oppression politics and
practice.

 

“…tokenization and paternalism are on any list of “fucked up” behaviors in
an anti-oppression practice, thus the practice protects itself from
open complicity with the very problems it creates. Human agency is a
fundamental component of freedom, perhaps the most important one;
therefore if someone is denied agency in their own struggle because the
most legit thing they can do is be an ally to someone else’s struggle,
it is inevitable that they will exercise their agency in the course of
supporting a struggle they view as someone else’s. To do so, they will
either look for any oppressed person who supports a form of struggle
they feel inclined towards, and use them as a legitimating façade, or
they will try to participate fully and affect the course of a broader
campaign or coalition in which they are pretending to be mere allies. In
other words, by presenting privilege as a good thing, anti-oppression
politics creates privileged people who have nothing to fight for and
inevitably tokenize or paternalize those whose struggles are deemed
(more) legitimate.”

Archipelago – AudioZine

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Archipelago – Affinity, Informal Organization, and Insurrectional Projects – From Salto #2 – MP3Read PrintArchive TorrentYouTube

This zine explores the topic of affinity and informal organization. The author(s) argue that informal organizations based on affinity are the ideal ways of acting as anarchist because they overcome the limits of qualitative projects and organizations that exist as ends in and of themselves. Incorporated into the text are criticisms of formal organizations and discussions of what exactly affinity means.

[Translated from Salto, subversion & anarchy, issue #2, november 2012 (Brussels).]

“We believe that anarchists have the most amount of freedom and autonomy of movement to intervene in social conflictivity if they organize themselves in small groups based on affinity, rather than in huge formations or in quantitative organizational forms. Of course, it is desirable and often necessary that these small groups are able to come to an understanding between each other.”

Musical Interludes: I Only Wish This For You by Saltland

With Allies Like These – AudioZine

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With Allies Like These: Reflections on Privilege Reductionism – by Common CauseMP3ReadPrint ArchiveTorrentYouTube

 “…this article aims to critically engage with the dominant ideas and practices of anti-oppression politics. We define anti-oppression politics as a related group of analyses and practices that seeks to address inequalities that materially, psychologically, and socially exist in society through education and personal transformation. While there is value in some aspects of anti-oppression politics, they are not without severe limitations. Anti-oppression politics obfuscates the structural operations of power and promotes a liberal project of inclusion that is necessarily at odds with the struggle to build a collective force capable of fundamentally transforming society. It is our contention that anti-oppression furthers a politics of inclusion as a poor substitute for a politics of revolution. The dominant practices of anti-oppression further an approach to struggle whose logical conclusion is the absorption of those deemed oppressed into the dominant order, but not to the eradication and transformation of the institutional foundations of oppression.”